Kumaré and The Art of iTunes

Tune your mind and tune your body by watching the film Kumaré.  How do you do it?  Find out how by watching our guru’s latest teaching: Kumaré and The Art of iTunes.

Kumaré is now available on iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, Xbox, PlayStation, and most cable video-on-demand platforms.

Kumaré is now available on iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, Xbox, PlayStation, and most cable video-on-demand platforms.

campsouth:

Kumare was really good, you should check it out if you get the chance.

Kumaré is coming to iTunes

Kumaré is coming to iTunes

gabriellasu:

I saw Kumare for 3 reasons alone: theater’s proximity to my apartment, my nostalgic yearn for ali g, and the weather conditions: rain, but Kumare turned out to be everything I love in a movie.  Satire, punking, chills, and finally forgetting about my world and questioning the world all at once.  

While sitting at the IFC Center, I knew that there were some viewers who felt mocked, some who felt that they were in on the joke/were smarter than the average (I go to the IFC, therefore I am superior) and others who possibly felt both.  And while some did not take away a lesson from this film, I’m someone who draws connections from nothing, enjoys a movie with a moral and for the most part always will think deeper into it than need be.  These images and words were my guru within tonight.

Unlike a Sacha Baron Cohen production that only exposes American stupidity. Gandhi exposed the social development of a country who’s size as well as its belief in freedom has resulted in confusion, struggle and yet still some sort of longing for a greatness.  Always wanting more, always wanting to better, in search of bliss, in search of control, in search of true freedom to be who we are, in search of individualism, in search of the collective, in search for another being to guide us to our mirror, hold it up and show us our own reflection.

A close friend once told me, we should only be with someone who inspires us to grow and to be a better person.  Yes, I am still skeptical of this idea completely, whether it be of the possibility of finding my penguin or it be of the hope that I am enough for myself, the truth is I am never completely alone in this world.  Every person, plant, image, word has the ability to produce an effect within me, and every effect eventually will ring positive.

All is an illusion.  I am an illusion.  And what does this mean?

Only what I want it to.

skarrwho:

Just went to watch Kumare at IFC with Chai.

To record the documentary, American filmmaker Vikram Gandhi transformed himself into Sri Kumaré, an enlightened guru from a fictional village in India, by adopting a fake Indian accent and growing out his hair and beard. In the film, Kumaré travels to Arizona to spread his made-up philosophy and gain sincere followers.[1][2]

Such a good film. I kind of ended up having an anxiety attack and an existential crisis halfway through, though. I also didn’t really eat anything today so that contributed to feeling ill lol. BUT IT WAS SUCH A GREAT SATIRE/SOCIAL COMMENTARY. Very emotionally compelling and intriguing too. 

streetcents:

Kūmārē
k. sybert

streetcents:

Kūmārē

k. sybert

scrape-your-knee:

237. Kumare
Savannah and I just sort of fell into seeing this…and it was absolutely incredible.
It is this documentary about a guy that loses his faith (he was raised strictly Hindu) and looks into gurus…and sees a lot of corruption and lies. So he decides to pretend he is a guru to see what happens. He never actually lies…he just changes his appearance and then makes all of his teachings say “This is fake, this is an illusion”. What starts off as a social experiment turns into a huge, life altering thing for his disciples and himself.
This was incredibly well made, with well-chosen material and good cinematography. It also leaves you with an amazing feeling, as you watch him start to really care about this people and takes it on to teach them that the only true guru is themselves. I would recommend this to anybody, so give it a watch.
A+.

scrape-your-knee:

237. Kumare

Savannah and I just sort of fell into seeing this…and it was absolutely incredible.

It is this documentary about a guy that loses his faith (he was raised strictly Hindu) and looks into gurus…and sees a lot of corruption and lies. So he decides to pretend he is a guru to see what happens. He never actually lies…he just changes his appearance and then makes all of his teachings say “This is fake, this is an illusion”. What starts off as a social experiment turns into a huge, life altering thing for his disciples and himself.

This was incredibly well made, with well-chosen material and good cinematography. It also leaves you with an amazing feeling, as you watch him start to really care about this people and takes it on to teach them that the only true guru is themselves. I would recommend this to anybody, so give it a watch.

A+.

poppysound:

Saw this documentarian on the Colbert Report. Film looks superfantastique.